FREE RESOURCES: Classroom Activities [ Page 2 ]
Student discussions, exercises, games before and after the play
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Fun Websites for Kid Frankenstein
Classroom Resources for ArtReach's Kid Frankenstein

Finally!  Frankenstein is Kid-Friendly!
Kid Frankenstein - Play for Kids to Perform
Pretty River Academy, Collingwood ON  Frankie the Kid Mad Scientist has some zany ideas!

Building Your Own Frankenstein Monster:
How to build a Frankenstein monster...

BrainPop Lesson Ideas:
https://educators.brainpop.com/bp-topic/frankenstein/...

10 Activities to Celebrate National Frankenstein Day:
http://www.educationworld.com/A_lesson/eight_frankenstein...

Friendly Frankenstein Crafts:
http://www.craftymorning.com/cute-frankenstein-crafts-for-kids-to-make/

Halloween Castle Frankenstein:
https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://frankenstein...

History of Classic Monsters:
http://www.librarypoint.org/history_of_classic_monsters...

How Mary Shelley used ideas, events, places to invent her famous monster:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/geography-of-frankenstein...

The Frankenstein Blog:
https://frankensteinia.blogspot.com/...

A List of Movies Based on Frankenstein:
https://frankensteinia.blogspot.com/...

Frankenstein's movie history: The good, bad and ugly:
https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2014/01/22/frankenstein...

Monsters: Why Halloween is a psychological ritual for kids and adults:
http://www.dw.com/en/power-to-the-monsters-why-halloween...

About Frankenstein the Movie 1931:
http://www.filmsite.org/fran.html

25 Monster Activities for Kids:
http://www.crayonfreckles.com/2014/10/25-monster-activities...


Classroom Fun: Music, Creative Writing and More
Learning with the Sleeping Beauty Teacher's Guide

DIFFERENT VERSIONS: Read both versions of the story and discuss which elements are similar and which are different. The castle, fairies, prince, spinning wheel and the kiss are in both stories. These stories were written many years ago.  Why do you think these are the parts of the stories that we remember the most?

FOLK TALES: The Brothers Grimm did not think that they were creating fairy tales. They were more interested in collecting stories that ordinary people told each other. Perrault used folk tales and added to them to create his own story. Discuss how the reasons for both directions. Consider the stories of another famous fairy tale writer, Hans Christian Andersen. Is he more like the Grimms or Perrault?

FAIRIES: Read the section on the history of fairies in this Teacher’s guide. How do fairies differ from living humans? Are they real or imaginary? Why do you think these beings play such a strong role in so many fairy tales? Do you like to pretend that you have a fairy as a friend. Describe your personal fairy and tell the class what magical powers your fairy has and why. Write a short story about how your fairy helped you in a trouble that you have at home, on the playground or at school.

Sleeping Beauty in the Classroom!
Sleeping Beauty Play for Kids Musical Play: Sleeping Beauty
Greenbier Valley Youth Theatre - GVTweens!

FAIRY TALES: Now that you have considered fairies, what do you think makes up a fairy tale? What must the fairy do in order to make the story end happily? If you were a fairy what things would you do to make things end happily in real life?

CREATIVE WRITING: Have the class write a fairy tale together. Remember to include the Princess, the Prince, the good fairies and the bad fairies. To help them create the story, provide them with settings such as the forest, a mountain, a castle, an island in the sea. Set it in the past or consider setting their story in the future which might include cities and outer space. Roll out paper on the floor and have them draw and paint different scenes from their own story.

SPINNING WHEELS: Read the section in this Teachers guide about spinning wheels. What do spinning wheels do and how do they work? How might a person prick their finger on such a device? Why did they use spinning wheels in the past but not today?

LIFE IN THE MIDDLE AGES: Talk about how the spinning wheel was one of the chores of a medieval family. Read the section in this Teacher’s Guide about Life in a Medieval Village. What other chores might they do that we do not do today? Would you like to live in those times or do you think it is better to live today? What might be better? What might be worse.

MUSIC: Listen to a recording of The Sleeping Beauty ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky. Much of the music in the play is taken from this ballet. Listen to various movements and discuss how the tempo and composition enhances the story. Can you pick out which parts are identified with Morgana and which parts are identified with the fairies?


The Nutcracker Prince
Classroom Activities & Discussions from ArtReach's Teacher's Guide for The Nutcracker Prince.

LAND OF SWEETS:  Imagine you could enter Clara's gingerbread castle and pass through to a fantasy land.  Clara visits a land that is filled with candy.  What kind of place would you like to visit?  What would you like to see there?  Animals, cartoons, toys, stars and planets?  Draw a picture of your own special Land.

SUGAR PLUM FAIRY:  Many years ago, when Tchaikovsky wrote the Nutcracker, children were used to receiving sugarplums for Christmas.  What kind of treats do you look forward to?  Ask a grownup for a recipe book and ask them to help you make treats for your class.

BATTLE:  Divide the class up between mice and toy soldiers.  Huddle with your group like football players do and think up a strategy to win.  Play the Tchaikovsky music for the battle scene in the Nutcracker and have your own battle! 

DREAMS:  What's the craziest dream you ever had?  What's the scariest?  Draw a picture of your dream and show it to the class.  Have students give each other suggestions on what they would do if they found themselves in that dream situation.   

Enchanting Holiday Fun for Families!
Nutcracker Prince Play for kids Christmas Play - Classic Nutcracker
ArtReach's The Nutcracker Prince   

CHRISTMAS GIFTS:  Fritz thought Clara's gift, a nutcracker was ugly and strange.  What strange gift have you received?  Talk about how you feel when you get an unusual gift.  Do you hate it or try to love it as Clara did?  What are the advantages of accepting a gift you might not have expected?  Consider the gifts you will give this Christmas and tell your friends why you have chosen to give those items.

MUSIC: Choose an instrument from the orchestra in the list shown in this guide.  Imagine that the instrument is actually a character or an animal.  How does it sound, walk, sing?  Put a silly orchestra together with your friends.  Try singing Christmas carols together - stay in character as you sing for a kooky song!

DANCE:  The Nutcracker music was written for ballet.  Play some of the different parts of the music and ask kids to make up their own dances.  It can be any kind of dance they enjoy.  Have the kids discuss their favorite dances and then do them together.

"Only those who truly love and who are truly strong can sustain their lives as a dream. You dwell in your own enchantment. Life throws stones at you, but your love and your dream change those stones into the flowers of discovery."
Ben Okri


The Legend of Origami Cranes
PCPA (Pacific Conservatoy Theatre, CA) Study Guide for ArtReach's Play, A Thousand Cranes

A Thousand origami cranes is a group of one thousand origami paper cranes held together by strings. An ancient Japanese legend promises that anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes will be granted a wish by a crane. Some stories believe you are granted eternal good luck, instead of just one wish, such as long life or recovery from illness or injury. This makes them popular gifts for special friends and family. The crane in Japan is one of the mystical or holy creatures (others include the dragon and the tortoise) and is said to live for a thousand years: That is why 1000 cranes are made, one for each year. In some stories it is believed that the 1000 cranes must be completed within one year and they must all be made by the person who is to make the wish at the end.

A thousand paper cranes are traditionally given as a wedding gift by the father, who is wishing a thousand years of happiness and prosperity upon the couple. They can also be given to a new baby for long life and good luck. Hanging them in one's home is thought to be a powerfully lucky and benevolent charm.

Wishing a thousand years of happiness and prosperity.
School Play for Children - A Thousand Cranes Seattle Peace Park Monument A Thousand Cranes (Folding Paper Cranes)

Several temples, including some in Tokyo and Hiroshima, have eternal flames for world peace. At these temples, school groups or individuals often donate origami cranes to add to the prayer for peace. The cranes are left exposed to the elements, slowly dissolving and becoming tattered as the wish is released.

Sets of origami paper are sold widely in Japan, with senbazuru sets including 1000 (or more, in case of mistakes) sheets of paper, string, and beads to place at the end of each string to stop the cranes from slipping off. Commonly the cranes are assembled as 25 strings of 40 cranes each.

The size of the origami paper does not matter when assembling a thousand paper cranes, but smaller sheets consequently yield smaller and lighter strings of cranes. The most popular size for senbazuru is 75 by 75 millimetres (3.0 in × 3.0 in). Some people cut their own squares of paper from anything available, such as magazines, newspapers, notebooks, and printer paper.

When learning as a production team at PCPA, we used plain copy paper and folded it into a square and cut off the small excess strip. This was an inexpensive way to learn and practice. When we were more confident in our skills, we used colored copy paper and eventually origami paper. Origami paper is usually of a solid color, though printed designs are available. Larger size origami paper, usually 6x6 inches, often has traditional Japanese or flower designs, reminiscent of kimono patterns.

See entire Study Guide here:  http://www.pcpa.org/outreach/1000cranesstudyguide.pdf


ArtReach's The Legend of Mulan Offers Martial Arts Opportunities
Learn Something New!

WHAT IS MARTIAL ARTS? 

This article is for all the fans of Jackie Chan, Bruce Lee, Jet Lee and Ninja turtles. How and where did the martial arts originate? This is perhaps one of the most debatable questions in the history that continues to puzzle the historians till date. If you ask ten different people, even from the same country, you will get ten different answers.

Martial art is the "art of combat" or "art of waging war". It comprises of a set of intricate movements that can be used for offensive or defensive purposes. Most historians believe that martial arts first originated in India. During 11th and 12th century AD, there was a popular form of martial arts, known as Kalaripayattu prevalent in the southern states of India. Bodhidharma, a famous Buddhist monk, learnt this art in India and when he went to China to propagate Buddhism, he introduced this art of fighting to the Chinese. He later incorporated certain changes in the Kalaripayattu way of fighting and gave birth to a new form of martial arts known as the Shaolin Kung Fu.

The need of protecting oneself made nearly every culture on earth develop its own form of self-defense and myriad forms of martial arts are in practice since time immemorial. 

Types of Martial Types of Martial Arts

The early Greek culture practiced a martial art known as Pankration, the art of complete strength. Pankration comprised of an eclectic mix of combative styles of wrestling, grappling and boxing techniques.

Sambo is a Russian martial art and combat sport. This combat style is based on ancient wrestling techniques and is now taught to the Russian military for hand to hand combat training.

 Martial arts are part of Mulan!
Martial arts are part of Mulan! Dragon Imoogi!
Great opportunities for students who study martial arts & acrobatics.

The ancient Romans also practiced martial arts and incorporated the use of various weapons and armors. They enjoyed the contests between man and beast in a fight to the death.

One of the most popular forms of martial arts, Karate, is said to have originated on the island of Okinawa in Japan, thousands of years ago. Since weapons were banned in Okinawa, the Okinawans developed strong hand-fighting techniques in order to defend themselves.

Another popular martial arts form Tae Kwon Do originated around 1300 years ago in Korea and is one of the oldest surviving martial arts. The origin of this combat form can be traced back to Buddhist monks who studied first in China and then brought their teachings to Korea.

Initially, China did not want to share the secrets of her martial arts strategies with other countries, but in the late 1960s, China began to slowly open their doors to the West, sharing her unique culture and traditions with the rest of the world. Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Jet Li and others brought introduced Kung Fu to mainstream America through Hollywood, unveiling the enigmatic techniques of martial arts before the common man.

The truth of the matter is most martial arts are similar. They all teach similar principles, just in different ways. It's like religion. There are so many different religions around the world, having different ways of worship and different deities, but all teach us only one thing, "God is one." Similarly, the one thing all martial arts have in common is that they teach us self-defense and increase our confidence level. e banned in Okinawa, the Okinawans developed strong hand-fighting techniques in order to defend themselves.

Another popular martial arts form Tae Kwon Do originated around 1300 years ago in Korea and is one of the oldest surviving martial arts. The origin of this combat form can be traced back to Buddhist monks who studied first in China and then brought their teachings to Korea.

Initially, China did not want to share the secrets of her martial arts strategies with other countries, but in the late 1960s, China began to slowly open their doors to the West, sharing her unique culture and traditions with the rest of the world. Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Jet Li and others brought introduced Kung Fu to mainstream America through Hollywood, unveiling the enigmatic techniques of martial arts before the common man.

The truth of the matter is most martial arts are similar. They all teach similar principles, just in different ways. It's like religion. There are so many different religions around the world, having different ways of worship and different deities, but all teach us only one thing, "God is one." Similarly, the one thing all martial arts have in common is that they teach us self-defense and increase our confidence level.

"You will never do anything in this world without courage.
It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor."
-- Aristotle


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